Comparing Jewish Americans and Asian Americans

By S. B. Woo, President, 80-20 Educational Foundation

Introduction: 80-20 Initiative, the Asian American political action committee, isdevoted to advance civil rights of Asian Americans  http://www.80-20initiative.net/andhttp://blog.sciencenet.cn/home.php?mod=space&uid=1565&do=blog&id=471528(see the second half of the article)
Ted_Liew_80-20
CA Assemblyman Ted Liew, speaking at our 2008 Endorsement Convention





Subject: ComparingJewish Americans. with Asian Americans

 Jewish  Americans  Asian  Americans
Population     6 million    2.5 times higher
Per person income Available for  Caucasians but not specifically for the Jewish; likely quite high The highest among all races, but probably  lower

than that of Jewish  Ams

Political influence & maturity Huge &  substantial. 14 Senators, & 3 Supreme Court Justices presently The lowest among all  races; not a single Sup. Court Justice, 1 senator (Mazie Hirono, Hawaii)
Discrimination against them, past and present Rampant  discrimination against them in jobs & college admissions in the  past.  Today, they are the most  influential. We are the new Jews  receiving discrimination

today.

Sense of duty towards helping their own people Very high.  They take pride in being Jews

& helping Jewish  Ams.  See below for details

Very low.  Our rich & powerful have NOT help their  own people much.   Sigh!

Asian Americans Are the New Jews

Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter DanielGolden called Asians “the new Jews, inheriting the mantle of the mostdisenfranchised group in college admissions.” Golden observed,”Average SAT scores for Asian Americans admitted to the Ivy Leagues aresubstantially above those for any other group, including whites…'”

Charity Begins At Home for Jewish Americans

Jewish Amsare politically aware and pay great attention to building it GROUP political clout. In 2010, the BIG-3 Jewish Am. organizations spend at least $28 per Jewish Am. to protect their rights and advance their rightful interests. See Footnote 1.

In contrast, 80-20 PAC and EducationalFoundation, probably the most effective Asian Am organization can only spend $0.007 per Asian Am. Why such a huge difference in financial abilities? See Footnote 2.

Asian American “Rich & Powerful” don’t Help Their Own People

In 2000, Lulu and Anthony Wang gave $25 million to Wellesley College. In2002, Charles B. Wang donated $52 million toSUNY.  In 2007, Jerry Yang and his wife Akiko Yamazaki pledged $75 millionto Stanford. In 2008, Oscar L. Tang gave $25 million to Philips Academy Andover. In 2012, Chao family including former Sec. of Labor Elaine Chao donated $40 million to Harvard Business School. The sum is 217 million over 12 years, averaging $18 million per year. While we appreciate these individuals for doing the good deeds for our nation, we like to respectfully Callto their attention the following contrast.

Incomparison, to the best of our knowledge, not a single Asian Am has given more than $3 million to an Asian Am cause in the history of America.

AsianAm is the most discriminated Race in the USA

As America’s mainstream media have increasinglynoted:

(a) Our children face the tallest barrier in applying to elite colleges, &

(b) our adults face the lowest glass ceiling in workplaces.

God helps those whohelp themselves.  We need to helpourselves more!

Sincerely,

S. B. Woo,

President, 80-20 Educational Foundation (EF)

Footnote 1 – Annual budget of 3 Jewish Am. orgs in2 010

AIPAC (American Israel Public Affairs Committee):  $67 million. Go http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Israel_Public_Affairs_Committee#Membership
ADL (Anti-DefamationLeague): $60 million in 2005,likely more now. Go http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0002_0_01146.html
AJC (American Jewish Committee): $42 million.   Gohttp://www.guidestar.org/PartnerReport.aspx?partner=justgivews&ein=13-5563393

Footnote 2 — In 2010, the annual budget of 80-20 PACand EF combined is about $100,000.



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